Who are the real culprits behind UK’s collapsing public services?

by Dan Glazebrook, RT

‘Anyone following David Cameron’s negotiations with the EU, or the subsequent ‘in-out’ referendum debate in Britain, would perhaps forgiven for believing that migration is the cause of all Britain’s woes.

Cameron himself has been cultivating the link in voters’ minds between migration and public service decline since at least 2013, when he made clear his desire to prevent migrants from accessing public services, including even the NHS.

But what began as just another piece of rightly-riduculed Tory vindictiveness has now reached a crescendo. Cameron’s recent push for an ’emergency brake’ on migrants’ benefits has served to deepen the false impression that it is migration that is putting public services under strain, a point which Theresa May has now been making explicitly.’

Public services are indeed coming under pressure, as made clear by recent reports that the NHS faces collapse or comments by leading children’s charity Barnado’s that the government is ‘no longer providing an adequate safety net’ for the poorest families, with ‘devastating effects’ for vulnerable youngsters. The wages of many are stagnating as well, with local government workers seeing their wages fall by 20 percent between 2010 and 2013, and a quarter of those working in social care in Britain now thought to be effectively working for below the minimum wage. The poorest 10 percent of the population, according to the Guardian, have seen their wages effectively slashed by 30 percent.

But are immigrants behind all this?

What the government would dearly love us to forget all about is what happened to the British economy and public finances in 2008 – and why.

At the beginning of 2008, the UK’s public debt (that is, money owed by the government to its creditors) stood at 43 percent of GDP. By the end of the year, that debt had increased to 153 percent of GDP – it had more than tripled, that is, in the space of just one year.

This massive jump was due to one reason alone. That reason was not ‘profligate spending’ on public services, nor was it shelling out on migrant benefits (for example, on that 0.5 percent of recent EU migrants who claim job seekers allowance). It was due solely to the ‘banker’s bailout’. Read all >>>

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Elsewhere: [Boggart Blog]…[Little Nicky Machiavelli]… [ Ian’s Authorsden Pages ]… [Scribd]…[Wikinut] … [ Boggart Abroad] … [ Grenteeth Bites ] … Ian Thorpe at Flickr ] … [ Tumblr ] … [Ian at Minds ] … [ The Original Boggart Blog] … [ Authorsden blog ]

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